Invasive Species

UPDATES: FIRST INVASIVE MOSQUITO DETECTED IN PLACER COUNTY ON AUGUST 28, 2019

The Placer Mosquito and Vector Control District detected an invasive (non-native) species of mosquito on Wednesday, August 28. The Aedes aegypti, commonly known as the yellow fever mosquito, was found in a residential south Placer County neighborhood east of Auburn Boulevard at Interstate 80. The California Department of Public Health confirmed the invasive species detection.

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The Aedes aegypti mosquito has been found in several Central Valley and southern California counties, including recent initial detections in San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties. The mosquito is small and dark with a white violin-shaped marking on its body. Aedes aegypti can transmit several viruses, including Zika, dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever. These viruses, however, have not been found circulating in California.

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Download FIRST INVASIVE SPECIES DETECTED IN PLACER COUNTY press release.

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For more information about invasive species in California, please visit the California Department of Public Health website.

For more information about Zika virus, please visit the California Department of Public Health website.

Other Invasive Species

Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, also has the potential to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses. This daytime biting mosquito is characterized by its small size and black and white stripes across its body and legs.

Some common characteristics of these new species:

  • These mosquitoes are aggressive people-biters that are most active during the day both indoors and outdoors.
  • The entire life cycle, from egg to adult, can occur in as little as 7-9 days. The life span for adult mosquitoes is around three weeks.
  • They have a short flight range, so mosquitoes are usually found in the same general area of the water source where they hatched as eggs.
  • Eggs are laid over a period of several days, are resistant to drying out, and can survive for periods of six or more months. These mosquitoes remain alive through the winter in the egg stage and when the eggs are covered with water in warm weather, the larvae hatch.
  • They use artificial and/or natural habitats to lay their eggs.